Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Forum for things that doesn't really have anything to do with hMailServer. Such as php.ini, beer, etc etc.
Post Reply
User avatar
sheffters
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 453
Joined: 2009-07-01 20:46
Contact:

Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by sheffters » 2009-10-05 20:53

Elo,

Just a quick note ... Orange home bradband blocks port 25 (idiots) ... so to send email you have to use a different port (26 works for me).

They block port 25 to everything but there own mail server.

Spent the last week wondering why my laptop wouldn't work at the G/F but would at home no worries.

So basically, if you want email, dont ever go near Orange ... I'm getting it changed asap ... most ridiculous BB supplier on the face of the planet.

S.

^DooM^
Site Admin
Posts: 13861
Joined: 2005-07-29 16:18
Location: UK

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by ^DooM^ » 2009-10-06 00:39

Unfortunately not the only one in the UK mate.
If at first you don't succeed, bomb disposal probably isn't for you! ヅ

User avatar
mattg
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 21186
Joined: 2007-06-14 05:12
Location: 'The Outback' Australia

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by mattg » 2009-10-06 01:38

Or in the rest of the world for that matter...

We have them here in Oz too.
Just 'cause I link to a page and say little else doesn't mean I am not being nice.
https://www.hmailserver.com/documentation

User avatar
dzekas
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 2486
Joined: 2005-10-13 21:28
Location: Lithuania

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by dzekas » 2009-10-06 06:15

sheffters wrote:Elo,

Just a quick note ... Orange home bradband blocks port 25 (idiots) ... so to send email you have to use a different port (26 works for me).
residential users don't run email servers. They usually run spambots and by blocking outgoing 25 port ISP reduces number of spam problems.

Instead of using made-up port use 587 (MSA) or 465 (SMTP over SSL).

User avatar
sheffters
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 453
Joined: 2009-07-01 20:46
Contact:

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by sheffters » 2009-10-06 10:12

I'm not talking about running a mail server ... I can't even send mail to any server on port 25 other than the orange one (and I think its stupid not to be able to use another mail provider, my own or a.n.other).
residential users don't run email servers. They usually run spambots and by blocking outgoing 25 port ISP reduces number of spam problems.
wouldn't have thought that were true ... If I was a spammer I'd use non-standard ports anyway to avoid filters and the like.

S.

User avatar
dzekas
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 2486
Joined: 2005-10-13 21:28
Location: Lithuania

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by dzekas » 2009-10-06 10:41

sheffters wrote:I'm not talking about running a mail server ... I can't even send mail to any server on port 25 other than the orange one (and I think its stupid not to be able to use another mail provider, my own or a.n.other).
residential users don't run email servers. They usually run spambots and by blocking outgoing 25 port ISP reduces number of spam problems.
wouldn't have thought that were true ... If I was a spammer I'd use non-standard ports anyway to avoid filters and the like.

S.
No, you won't. Other email servers use 25 port. Spammers want to reach those servers and they can't change port used by those standard smtp servers.

Spammer could try 587 or 465, but any sane admin would set these two to require AUTH.

If user with dynamic address wants to send emails, he or she should use ISPs email server or you should offer MSA/SMTP over SSL ports for such users.

User avatar
pepsi
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 419
Joined: 2008-08-21 20:58
Location: Netherlands

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by pepsi » 2009-10-09 14:32

Here in the NL my ISP blocks port 25 for outgoing mail. for that porpose i need to relay my mail using there mailserver as relay.

but for i few buck i bought a static IP. and guess what. port25 isn't blocked for me anymore.

there must be an RFC to set a DNS record on what port you want to receive mail

roi
Normal user
Normal user
Posts: 153
Joined: 2009-09-20 12:56
Location: Chiba, Japan

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by roi » 2009-10-22 04:12

When ISP's in Japan started blocking port 25, I was up in arms and changed ISP's twice to try to circumvent the blocking, but to no avail. Soon enough, everybody blocked port 25. So I was forced to use my ISP server for SMTP and my server for POP3/IMAP.

Looking back, I suppose the blocking of port 25 in consumer broadband was a wise move. Before then, spammers were injecting dedicated smpt engines into unsuspecting consumers' PC's and spammers were sending out junk without much hindrance.

Now, most mail servers are capable of authentication for smpt via port 587, blocking port 25 has mostly reduced "outgoing" spam. The blocking of port 25 effectively reduced the number of IP addresses that spammers could use, so spammers active (and limited) IP addresses could more effectively be blacklisted.

The benefits of blocking port 25 was not readily apparent to the consumer because the move prevented spammers from using the consumer's pc to send out spam, and had little or nothing to do with blocking incoming spam. It also prevented consumer's dynamic IP address from being unfairly blacklisted.

I have 16 static IP addresses, but I still use a dynamic IP address line for email client, web browsing and "office" work. The fact that hMail can use multiple ports in addition to port 25 has allowed me to smtp directly with my server through my dynamic IP address line. I don't even use my ISP's mail server (although my dynamic IP line includes one email account.)
hMS: 5.2.1-B361 | DB: Internal MySQL from hMS 4.4 | OS: W2K3 1Gb VM

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 14:59

I don't see the problem with any provider setting a specific port for using their smtp server. Providing their subscribers know to use that port number then whats the problem?
Infact the wider the range of ports being used the harder it will be for spammers to spam.

^DooM^
Site Admin
Posts: 13861
Joined: 2005-07-29 16:18
Location: UK

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by ^DooM^ » 2009-10-25 15:01

Restricting ports is not what I would call getting what I pay for. I will only choose ISP's that do not restrict port usage.
If at first you don't succeed, bomb disposal probably isn't for you! ヅ

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 15:11

but don't providers give either give 25 or one other port? so where is the restriction? you get 25 or you get 26. I still don't see the problem...

^DooM^
Site Admin
Posts: 13861
Joined: 2005-07-29 16:18
Location: UK

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by ^DooM^ » 2009-10-25 15:26

Other peoples email servers send email to you on port 25. You can't change that it will always be 25. Your ISP blocks incoming port 25, you cant receive email directly. You want to send email to other servers you have to send it TO port 25. If your ISP blocks outgoing port 25 you cannot send email directly. Sure you could use your ISP's mail server but I for one want to use my own mail server on a line i pay for. The mailserver that runs on my home line also acts as the backup MX for my other mailservers. So with this information in mind do you now see the problem?
If at first you don't succeed, bomb disposal probably isn't for you! ヅ

roi
Normal user
Normal user
Posts: 153
Joined: 2009-09-20 12:56
Location: Chiba, Japan

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by roi » 2009-10-25 15:46

percepts - I think you are on a different frequency as DooM. DooM is saying he does not agree to any sort of port blocking... period. On the other hand, you are saying that blocking port 25 doesn't matter.

Actually, blocking port 25 does matter since that is the standard port that mail servers need to listen to, to have an SMTP conversation. If you don't have port 25 open, you basically lose the ability to have a server that can talk on equal terms with other standard mail servers. So in reverse, having port 26 doesn't mean much since standard mail servers will not be using that port so they can't (won't) talk with your server directly on port 26.

To some extent, I can understand DooM's position because blocking any port is underestimating the intelligence and ability of users to protect themselves from abuse -- and without doubt, DooM is way above average in being IT-savy. In fact, he is way above us in this regard. On the other hand, I must admit that the majority of users cannot, nor may not even care, to protect themselves from being remotely abused by others -- to the detriment of others (spam).

Another way to look at this is that blocking any port can be considered as a form of censorship, and that is not what democracy stands for. Internet, after all, is suppose to be an open form of communication -- a very democratic form of communication.

Port blocking by ISP's is a touchy and controversial issue for sure.
hMS: 5.2.1-B361 | DB: Internal MySQL from hMS 4.4 | OS: W2K3 1Gb VM

^DooM^
Site Admin
Posts: 13861
Joined: 2005-07-29 16:18
Location: UK

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by ^DooM^ » 2009-10-25 15:51

I wouldn't mind ISP's blocking by default as long as you can request the port be opened. That would work for 99% of users i'm sure!
If at first you don't succeed, bomb disposal probably isn't for you! ヅ

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 15:56

No ISP blocks mail which was sent from port 25. If they did, no one would get any mail except from a few servers using the same port as the ISP. They block outgoing mail not on port 25. Besides the smtp port is for sending only and not receiving as I undertsand it.

roi
Normal user
Normal user
Posts: 153
Joined: 2009-09-20 12:56
Location: Chiba, Japan

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by roi » 2009-10-25 16:06

^DooM^ wrote:I wouldn't mind ISP's blocking by default as long as you can request the port be opened. That would work for 99% of users i'm sure!
Good point. I never thought of it that way. Now that you called my attention to this realistic option, it would appear to me that the only reason ISP's don't give us that option is because they want to charge more money for all opened ports lines...

Another topic related to port blocking is bandwidth trottling... where upload is narrower and download is broader with ADSL/DSL. This makes for very slow servers. Fortunately, fiber optics provide the same bandwidth for uploads and downloads.

So yes... I'm with you on being anti-port-blocking. I think I should send a copy of this thread to my dynamic IP address ISP.
hMS: 5.2.1-B361 | DB: Internal MySQL from hMS 4.4 | OS: W2K3 1Gb VM

^DooM^
Site Admin
Posts: 13861
Joined: 2005-07-29 16:18
Location: UK

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by ^DooM^ » 2009-10-25 16:09

percepts wrote:No ISP blocks mail which was sent from port 25.
Correct. Mail servers have to send on port 25 though which is the problem.
percepts wrote:If they did, no one would get any mail except from a few servers using the same port as the ISP.
Exactly why it has to be port 25 e;se no other mailserver would send to you or receive from you.
percepts wrote:They block outgoing mail not on port 25.
No why would they do that?
percepts wrote:Besides the smtp port is for sending only and not receiving as I undertsand it.
You are incorrect. It is used for both sending and receiving between mailservers.
If at first you don't succeed, bomb disposal probably isn't for you! ヅ

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 16:15

Throttling is not to do with upload and download speeds being different. ADSL is not Asynchronous by design. It has to use frequencies outside of those used for voice and it was designed for use as primarily download delivery. If you want Asynchronous you have to pay £6000 a year plus for 2Mbit in the UK with a dedicated phone line. And I wouldn't count on fibre optic being asynchronous either.
Throttling is where ISP's deliberately reduce your download line speed to share available resource with more people. Thats why I use Newnet who don't throttle. Unfortunately I don't live in the area where they have LLU in exchanges and you get very fast ADSL2+ speeds for both download and upload.
roi wrote:
^DooM^ wrote:I wouldn't mind ISP's blocking by default as long as you can request the port be opened. That would work for 99% of users i'm sure!
Good point. I never thought of it that way. Now that you called my attention to this realistic option, it would appear to me that the only reason ISP's don't give us that option is because they want to charge more money for all opened ports lines...

Another topic related to port blocking is bandwidth trottling... where upload is narrower and download is broader with ADSL/DSL. This makes for very slow servers. Fortunately, fiber optics provide the same bandwidth for uploads and downloads.

So yes... I'm with you on being anti-port-blocking. I think I should send a copy of this thread to my dynamic IP address ISP.

^DooM^
Site Admin
Posts: 13861
Joined: 2005-07-29 16:18
Location: UK

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by ^DooM^ » 2009-10-25 16:29

I am on LLU / ADSL+2 It's awesome :)

Image
If at first you don't succeed, bomb disposal probably isn't for you! ヅ

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 16:39

My email client sends a request to a mailserver to send my mail to a target mailserver. The request from my client has to be on the port which the mailserver accepts for this type of request. The mail server then sends the mail to the target mailserver. That send may (I don't know) have a different type of request headers saying it is a delivery request or some such. A mail server should know the difference and I presume it does which is why orange will receive mails from port 25 sent mails. Had the request been to relay the message to another server such as in the original client request to send the email, then as I understand it, orange wouldn't do it becuase it only does this on port 26.
So effectively orange is refusing to relay mail unless its on port 26.

But hmailserver allows to specify relay server and its port number for relay so if my isp were orange and I wanted to relay messages through their smtp server, then I would have to specify port 26 in the mail relay. Don't know why I would I want to do that but the option is in HmailServer.

Is my understanding of this correct? I'm just trying to get a handle on this being new to mailservers.

^DooM^ wrote:
percepts wrote:No ISP blocks mail which was sent from port 25.
Correct. Mail servers have to send on port 25 though which is the problem.
percepts wrote:If they did, no one would get any mail except from a few servers using the same port as the ISP.
Exactly why it has to be port 25 e;se no other mailserver would send to you or receive from you.
percepts wrote:They block outgoing mail not on port 25.
No why would they do that?
percepts wrote:Besides the smtp port is for sending only and not receiving as I undertsand it.
You are incorrect. It is used for both sending and receiving between mailservers.

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 16:55

I'm moving soon and I have been researching whats available where I'm going and the cost. O2 claim upto 2.5Mbps upload speed on their 20Mbit package if they have LLU. I'm highly scepticle about that claim as everyone else doesn't come close. Even telewest with a business line 12:1 contention and 20Mbit download only claim upto 1.5Mbit upload.
I think with LLU the 1/8th upload speed has gone out the window but it remains to be seen. Your test gives 1/11th.
Most of these speed tests are not very reliable as they measure only short bursts. Its sustained throughput which is important if you want to move anything larger than 200KB.

Bt have a good tester which gives sustained throughput. You will need to enter your isp login at somepoint in the test.

http://www.speedtester.bt.com/

^DooM^ wrote:I am on LLU / ADSL+2 It's awesome :)

Image

User avatar
sheffters
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 453
Joined: 2009-07-01 20:46
Contact:

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by sheffters » 2009-10-25 17:07

[quote="^DooM^"]I am on LLU / ADSL+2 It's awesome :)

Virgin Media 50Mb rocks ... tho in reality i never get more than about 20-25Mb on a connection ... Sun downloads being an exception.

If you really need speed then use a server as a proxy for a few quid ... theres a few about that do cheap servers with 100Mb unlimited connections and proxy off that so it can deal with all the latency / prefetching / filtering and the like so 15-20Mb feels twice as fast in my experiance.

S.

roi
Normal user
Normal user
Posts: 153
Joined: 2009-09-20 12:56
Location: Chiba, Japan

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by roi » 2009-10-25 17:41

percepts wrote: And I wouldn't count on fibre optic being asynchronous either.
Fiber Optics is definitely asynchronous... and not easily trottled (not yet anyway) so they have the same upload/download bandwidth. I think ADSL is trottled DSL on upload stream.
hMS: 5.2.1-B361 | DB: Internal MySQL from hMS 4.4 | OS: W2K3 1Gb VM

^DooM^
Site Admin
Posts: 13861
Joined: 2005-07-29 16:18
Location: UK

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by ^DooM^ » 2009-10-25 18:18

percepts wrote:My email client sends a request to a mailserver to send my mail to a target mailserver. The request from my client has to be on the port which the mailserver accepts for this type of request. The mail server then sends the mail to the target mailserver. That send may (I don't know) have a different type of request headers saying it is a delivery request or some such. A mail server should know the difference and I presume it does which is why orange will receive mails from port 25 sent mails. Had the request been to relay the message to another server such as in the original client request to send the email, then as I understand it, orange wouldn't do it becuase it only does this on port 26. So effectively orange is refusing to relay mail unless its on port 26.
It has nothing to do with checking to see what you are sending it has everything to do with the firewall allowing connections from their own users on port 25 to their own mailserver. Their own mailserver is not restricted only their users. Orange users cannot run their own mailservers on their own machines because of the port 25 block however you can setup hMail to realy through the ISP's mailserver which will be allowed. You are of course relying on the ISP's mailserver and are bound by their sending restrictions.

If you own multiple mailservers and want to keep them secure and away from the internet (having them on an intranet instead) you can specify whatever port you want. I could setup 10 mailservers and set them all to listen on and send on port 2031 and they would all work between themselves but I could not send to any other servers that I do not control because they send on and receive on port 25.
If at first you don't succeed, bomb disposal probably isn't for you! ヅ

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 18:19

expalin why only 2Mb upload then?

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&so ... ibre+optic

and since BT are supplying fibre optic to everyone else wholsale, you can expect the same.

It strikes me that it is designed to stop everyone from setting up home servers that do anything more than light serving. i.e. not good enough for streaming anything. That way they can screw you for having a decent upload speed line installed. The whole thing is designed to pump data TO households and not the other way round. Namely TV, video and film downloads.
I was told that in Japan a lot of the country has 400Mb speed by default. Don't know the truth of that. So why is BT only putting 40Mb connections in? I guess you should never need more than that. Never say Never.

^DooM^
Site Admin
Posts: 13861
Joined: 2005-07-29 16:18
Location: UK

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by ^DooM^ » 2009-10-25 18:41

Because of the noise generated by household appliances in the copper wire.

Anyway this is a small diag on what ISP's do when they block you and give you a relay option on a different port, Most ISP's dont give you an alternate port though they allow you to send on port 25 but their ISP firewall will only allow port 25 connections to their own mailserver. does this make sense now?
isp diag.jpg
If at first you don't succeed, bomb disposal probably isn't for you! ヅ

roi
Normal user
Normal user
Posts: 153
Joined: 2009-09-20 12:56
Location: Chiba, Japan

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by roi » 2009-10-25 18:54

percepts wrote:expalin why only 2Mb upload then?.
Oh... so they have found a way to trottle fiber optics already? Is this 2Mb upload you are talking about on a fiber optics? If you are talking of 50Mb/s fiber optics line, 2Mb/s upstream is awfully slow (not much different from 1.3Mb/s upstream of ADSL+2 that was mentioned in this topic.)

I have two 100Mb/s fiber optics line here in Japan and both are doing 70-80Mb/s up/down average (no difference between up and down stream at any given time.) FYI, one is dynamic and the other has 16 fixed addresses. The dynamic can drop to 40-50Mb/s during heavy traffic hours, but still the same up or down.
percepts wrote:and since BT are supplying fibre optic to everyone else wholsale, you can expect the same.
Here in Japan, line providers are also selling fiber optics dynamic lines wholsale to everyone else, but fiber optics are not trottled unlike copper connections. So wholsale does not necessarily equate to controlling upstream bandwidth. I understand that technically speaking, trottling is easy to do with narrow band (copper) but a bit more difficult to do on ultra wide band (fiber optics) because of the sheer speed and volume of data -- trottling fiber optics will bring the data to a halt (relatively speaking.) I am not technically equipped to explain, but the technicians who installed my fiber optics 5 years ago told me trottling fiber optics is easier said than done.
hMS: 5.2.1-B361 | DB: Internal MySQL from hMS 4.4 | OS: W2K3 1Gb VM

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 19:24

Yes its BT (British Telecom) latest and greatest offering for general use by everyone but it is only just being trialled in a couple of areas of the country. Why it is not going to be faster I don't know. I suspect it a policy of drip feeding to keep revenue streams coming in as people want more. The technology is available to make it much much faster but they won't do it. And it will not be asynchronous unless you pay for a dedicated line which will be very expensive.
Currently over £8000 per year for a 10Mbit asynchronous line.
roi wrote:
percepts wrote:expalin why only 2Mb upload then?.
Oh... so they have found a way to trottle fiber optics already? Is this 2Mb upload you are talking about on a fiber optics? If you are talking of 50Mb/s fiber optics line, 2Mb/s upstream is awfully slow (not much different from 1.3Mb/s upstream of ADSL+2 that was mentioned in this topic.)

I have two 100Mb/s fiber optics line here in Japan and both are doing 70-80Mb/s up/down average (no difference between up and down stream at any given time.) FYI, one is dynamic and the other has 16 fixed addresses. The dynamic can drop to 40-50Mb/s during heavy traffic hours, but still the same up or down.
percepts wrote:and since BT are supplying fibre optic to everyone else wholsale, you can expect the same.
Here in Japan, line providers are also selling fiber optics dynamic lines wholsale to everyone else, but fiber optics are not trottled unlike copper connections. So wholsale does not necessarily equate to controlling upstream bandwidth. I understand that technically speaking, trottling is easy to do with narrow band (copper) but a bit more difficult to do on ultra wide band (fiber optics) because of the sheer speed and volume of data -- trottling fiber optics will bring the data to a halt (relatively speaking.) I am not technically equipped to explain, but the technicians who installed my fiber optics 5 years ago told me trottling fiber optics is easier said than done.

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 19:32

^DooM^ wrote:Because of the noise generated by household appliances in the copper wire.

Anyway this is a small diag on what ISP's do when they block you and give you a relay option on a different port, Most ISP's dont give you an alternate port though they allow you to send on port 25 but their ISP firewall will only allow port 25 connections to their own mailserver. does this make sense now?
isp diag.jpg
Now I'm still not 100% on this. If you are saying that your ISP connection doesn't allow the use of port 25 on the whole line, then I understand. But I was thinking it was just the SMTP server not allowing port 25 connection. And does anything directed to your own hmailserver have to come via the orange smtp server? I didn't think so, so it didn't make sense it wouldn't work. But if it is the whole Line connection which has port 25 blocked, then that makes sense.

roi
Normal user
Normal user
Posts: 153
Joined: 2009-09-20 12:56
Location: Chiba, Japan

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by roi » 2009-10-25 19:58

I can only suspect that BT's trunk pipe infrastructure is not yet wide enough to accommodate the aggregate traffic that will be generated via fiber optics to the homes. So while the fiber optics to the home (as an infrastructure) are capable of higher speed, the trunk lines have not yet been updated to handle the total traffic from those home fiber optics. Maybe copper technology is being used to intentionally slow down the fiber optic traffic... (2Mb/s up to 10Mb/s down is actually top copper speed level). I'm guessing here... I am not technically qualified to really explain why.

One thing clear is that speed is equal to the least common denominator, so if copper is used somewhere along the way, then we only get copper speed. So even if you and I have fiber optics, but copper is used in between, our connection speed is only as good as what the copper can offer.
hMS: 5.2.1-B361 | DB: Internal MySQL from hMS 4.4 | OS: W2K3 1Gb VM

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 20:03

Yes I suppose that is a possibility. We seem to be miles behind the rest of the western world in this regard. As usual they are talking about taxing us to pay for it when they have been making billions in profits and handing it to share holders instead of making proper re-investment in the infrastructure. That's modern Britain for you...
roi wrote:I can only suspect that BT's trunk pipe infrastructure is not yet wide enough to accommodate the aggregate traffic that will be generated via fiber optics to the homes. So while the fiber optics to the home (as an infrastructure) are capable of higher speed, the trunk lines have not yet been updated to handle the total traffic from those home fiber optics. Maybe copper technology is being used to intentionally slow down the fiber optic traffic... (2Mb/s up to 10Mb/s down is actually top copper speed level). I'm guessing here... I am not technically qualified to really explain why.

One thing clear is that speed is equal to the least common denominator, so if copper is used somewhere along the way, then we only get copper speed. So even if you and I have fiber optics, but copper is used in between, our connection speed is only as good as what the copper can offer.

^DooM^
Site Admin
Posts: 13861
Joined: 2005-07-29 16:18
Location: UK

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by ^DooM^ » 2009-10-25 20:16

I'm not on orange.

Port 25 OUTBOUND is blocked to all except their own mailserver which can be used to relay email. (this prevents spam bots and trojans hijacking pc's and sending out tons of spam)
Port 25 INBOUND is allowed.

This is the most common scenario employed by a large percentage of ISP's worldwide not just in the UK.
If at first you don't succeed, bomb disposal probably isn't for you! ヅ

percepts
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 5282
Joined: 2009-10-20 16:33
Location: Sceptred Isle

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by percepts » 2009-10-25 20:25

OK so now I'm clear on this. It has nothing to do with the mailserver. It is ISP's blocking line ports on their infrastructure. That makes much more sense. Sorry for the mis understanding which stems, I think, from it being explained as blocking mail on port 25 (my interpretation) when really it is blocking communication on port 25 with exceptions.
Thanks...
^DooM^ wrote:I'm not on orange.

Port 25 OUTBOUND is blocked to all except their own mailserver which can be used to relay email. (this prevents spam bots and trojans hijacking pc's and sending out tons of spam)
Port 25 INBOUND is allowed.

This is the most common scenario employed by a large percentage of ISP's worldwide not just in the UK.

^DooM^
Site Admin
Posts: 13861
Joined: 2005-07-29 16:18
Location: UK

Re: Orange (UK) Home Broadband

Post by ^DooM^ » 2009-10-25 21:22

You're welcome :)
If at first you don't succeed, bomb disposal probably isn't for you! ヅ

Post Reply