hmail server at home DNS setting

Use this forum if you have installed hMailServer and want to ask a question related to a production release of hMailServer. Before posting, please read the troubleshooting guide. A large part of all reported issues are already described in detail here.
Post Reply
julianhaines
New user
New user
Posts: 1
Joined: 2024-02-12 10:14

hmail server at home DNS setting

Post by julianhaines » 2024-02-12 10:23

Good day,

I am setting up hMailServer at home and I am trying to find the correct MX record format to use on my Domains, can anyone give me some examples?

Thanks

User avatar
jim.bus
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 1542
Joined: 2011-05-28 11:49
Location: US

Re: hmail server at home DNS setting

Post by jim.bus » 2024-02-12 12:01

We can't really teach you all about DNS.

Did you read this hMailServer Help Documentation?

https://www.hmailserver.com/documentati ... _static_ip

DNS entries are usually set up in a Zone File with a Zone Editor. The Format of the Zone File differs from one ISP's Zone File to another. But basically you need to set up an A-Record which defines a Host Name which points to the Local Network IP Address of your hMailServer is runnning in. You then for each Domain you host in hMailServer need to set up an MX Record in each DNS Domain which points to that Host Name. What the format of a DNS Entry in the Zone File looks like you would have to get from probably your Domain Registrar. Usually, you only need one host name for all the MX-Records in all of your DNS Domains.

In my case when I first started using hMailServer, I looked at the DNS Zone file for my Domain Registrar's set up of my Domain. Since I was also at the time using their Email Service, I just substituted my host name and IP Address for their host name for both the A-Record and MX Record.

But I hope you know you've got a lot more work to do to properly configure your DNS. You additionally need to set up minimally a TXT-Record for SPF. And again when I set up mine, I just substituted into my Registrars DNS TXT-SPF Record my host names instead of their host name. If you don't set up the TXT-SPF Record, you risk having Receiving Email Servers reject your Email that you send to them and your IP Address might get Black Listed as well.

The A-Record which defines your host name for hMailServer also needs to point to a non-Residential IP Address as many Dynamic Residential IP Addresses automatically are Black Listed. You also need to have your ISP set up a PTR Record (Reverse DNS Record) for you as your hMailServer IP Address may also be Black listed if you do not have a PTR Record.
If you think you understand quantum mechanics, you don't understand quantum mechanics.

User avatar
mattg
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 22417
Joined: 2007-06-14 05:12
Location: 'The Outback' Australia

Re: hmail server at home DNS setting

Post by mattg » 2024-02-12 22:48

DNS MX records need to point to the public IP address of your mail server

If you are asking about local mail client access to your server, use the local IP address of your hmailserver installation in the 'server name' field in your mail client mail server settings
Just 'cause I link to a page and say little else doesn't mean I am not being nice.
https://www.hmailserver.com/documentation

User avatar
SorenR
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 6268
Joined: 2006-08-21 15:38
Location: Denmark

Re: hmail server at home DNS setting

Post by SorenR » 2024-02-13 02:02

mattg wrote:
2024-02-12 22:48
DNS MX records need to point to the public IP address of your mail server

If you are asking about local mail client access to your server, use the local IP address of your hmailserver installation in the 'server name' field in your mail client mail server settings
I emulate a "split horizon/view DNS". Whatever is listed on my public DNS is mirrored on my internal DNS with internal addresses clearly ;-)

Normally a "split horizon/view DNS" is the same DNS server for both private and public use. You will have a "private zone" and a "public zone" and you will define view's based on the origin of the IP address requesting the lookup.
SørenR.

Old data analysts don’t die – they just get broken down by age and sex.

Post Reply